Inducted to the Walk of Fame on April 18, 1989 with 1 star. Comments
Quick Facts
Born:
January 14,
Los Angeles, California, USA
Education:
University High School in West L.A, CA
Ethnicity:
Caucasian

John Allan "Jack" Jones is an American jazz and pop singer. He was one of the most popular vocalists of the 1960s.

He was rated highly by Frank Sinatra, Mel Tormé and Tony Bennett and a major influence on Scott Walker. Judy Garland called him the best jazz singer in the world, although Jones was primarily a straight pop singer whose ventures in the direction of jazz were mostly of the big band/swing variety. Jones won two Grammy Awards. He performs concerts around the world and remains popular in Las Vegas. Some of his best-known recordings are "Wives and Lovers", "The Race Is On", "Lollipops and Roses", "The Impossible Dream", "Call Me Irresponsible", "Lady", and "The Love Boat Theme".

His birth name is John Allan Jones, the only son of actors Allan Jones and Irene Hervey. Jack Jones was born in Los Angeles on the very night that his father recorded his signature song "Donkey Serenade". The young Jones attended University High School in West Los Angeles and studied drama and singing. His first professional break was with his father, when Allan Jones was performing at the Thunderbird Hotel and Casino in Las Vegas. He recorded a couple of demos for songwriter Don Raye, attracting attention from the music industry. In 1959, Jones was signed to Capitol Records and released the album This Love of Mine and a few singles. None of these records sold well, and his contract was cut short. These early singles were compiled in the budget album The Romantic Voice of Jack Jones, released in the early 1970s in the UK by the label Music For Pleasure.

After being dropped by Capitol, Jones was drafted and spent some time in the US Air Force. Back to civilian life, he had more luck with his next company, Kapp Records. In August 1961 he recorded the ballad "Lollipops and Roses", which became a hit in the following year.

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